Church and Community, Culture, Theo Depot Original

Attacks on Christian Vestments and Symbols in the West

0 Comments 18 October 2011

How many motion pictures have you seen where people who don the traditional garb of ministers has been shown in a good light? Probably not many. There is a general trend in the media to portray the traditional symbols of Christianity in negative lighting. Obviously, the easiest target for this attack is the Catholic Church, […]

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Theo Depot Original

Mythology and the Post-Modern Age

0 Comments 04 September 2011

For centuries, the allure of ancient myths has had tremendous effect on societies. We have to remember that at one time, a culture’s or nation’s mythology was a full-blown belief system. To the Greeks, Zeus was just as real as the thunderbolts he tossed down; so was Poseidon and the rest of the Pantheon. To […]

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Mosquito Bite Suggestion

0 Comments 06 July 2013

Source Tis the season for annoying bug bites, but a surprisingly simple remedy exists that can eliminate all of the itch within minutes. All you have to do is heat up a metal spoon under hot tap water for a minute or so, then press it directly against ...

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A reader writes: My favorite book!

0 Comments 06 July 2013

A reader writes: Your book " The Secret Message of Jesus is my favorite book! It has helped me refocus my whole life's perspective toward seeing, sharing and bringing in the Kingdom. I reread it at least once a year. I'm so glad to hear that. I think ...

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The Case Against Sugar

0 Comments 06 July 2013

From Megan Garber: Substances like alcohol are regulated according to four criteria. For a government to take that big step on behalf of its citizens, a substance must: 1. Be ubiquitous 2. Be toxic 3. Be addictive 4. Have a negative impact on society There is, according to Robert Lustig, a substance that fits the bill [Read More...]

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Q & R: DOMA and the word “marriage”

0 Comments 06 July 2013

Here's the Q: Recently read your book another kind of Christianity and it made me think a lot. Also challenged some of my traditional conservative beliefs. One thing it did was show me that there were classes of people I just did not like. But Jesu...

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Weekly Meanderings, July 6, 2013

0 Comments 06 July 2013

Quote of the week, by Erik Ainge on Mark Sanchez, Jets QB: ”I’d know as good as anybody — what Mark does off the field is child’s play. He’s dumb about it. He’s stupid while being stupid. You have to be smart while being stupid, and he’s dumb while being dumb.” Ethnic diversity marks the American [Read More...]

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Weekly Meanderings, July 6, 2013

0 Comments 06 July 2013

Quote of the week, by Erik Ainge on Mark Sanchez, Jets QB: ”I’d know as good as anybody — what Mark does off the field is child’s play. He’s dumb about it. He’s stupid while being stupid. You have to be smart while being stupid, and he’s dumb while being dumb.” Ethnic diversity marks the American [Read More...]

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Weekly Meanderings, July 6, 2013

0 Comments 06 July 2013

Quote of the week, by Erik Ainge on Mark Sanchez, Jets QB: ”I’d know as good as anybody — what Mark does off the field is child’s play. He’s dumb about it. He’s stupid while being stupid. You have to be smart while being stupid, and he’s dumb while being dumb.” Ethnic diversity marks the American [Read More...]

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The Supreme Court Last Week

0 Comments 05 July 2013

There was a lot of attention, deservedly so, about the Court's decisions last week in relation to marriage equality. There was less attention about a disturbing decision made by the court regarding the Voting Rights Act. This NYT graphic shows why the voting rights act matters and why the Court's decision last week opens the way for a resurgence of racism. All of us who believe that all people, regardless of race, are God's beloved children need to prepare ourselves to speak up, speak out, stand up, and get out on the streets when necessary, as many are already doing. My friend Joshua DuBois' article on black men in America could not be more timely. Quotable (the whole article is incredibly important): THE EARLIEST chapter in that story is a tough one. I’d rather skip it. You’d rather that I skip it. But as Ralph Ellison once remarked, channeling Faulkner, our complicated racial past is “a part of the living present”; it’s a past that “speaks even when no one wills to listen.” The facts are a bit overwhelming, but not in much dispute. Africans were imported to the United States as purchased goods beginning around 1620. By 1770, when Crispus Attucks, a free black man, spilled the first drop of blood in the cause of the American Revolution, nearly 18 percent of the American population—almost 700,000 people—were slaves. By the time of the Emancipation Proclamation, that number had exploded to over 4 million. Beneath these sterile facts lay a grisly reality. Blacks were systemically dehumanized for hundreds of years, a practice that had unique social and psychological effects on men. They were worked and whipped in fields like cattle. Any semblance of pride, any cry for justice, any measure of genuine manhood was tortured, beaten, or sold out of them. Marriage was strictly prohibited. Most were forbidden from learning to read and write. The wealth derived from their labor—the massive wealth derived from cotton, our chief export throughout much of the 19th and early 20th centuries—was channeled elsewhere. But, because slavery ended 150 years ago, we often assume that this dehumanization is ancient history. It is not. As Douglas Blackmon of The Wall Street Journal meticulously documents in his Pulitzer Prize–winning book, Slavery by Another Name, blacks were kept in virtual bondage through Jim Crow laws, sharecropping, and, quite often, a form of quasi-slavery called peonage, which endured well into the middle of the 20th century. Here’s how it worked: black men (it was usually men) were arrested for petty crimes or no crimes at all; “selling cotton after sunset” was a favorite charge. They were then assessed a steep fine. If they could not pay, they were imprisoned for long sentences and forced to work for free. This allowed savvy industrialists to replace thousands of slaves with thousands of convicts.

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Doctors and Dying

0 Comments 05 July 2013

Source: Valuable for pastors. A recent RadioLab podcast, titled The Bitter End, identified an interesting paradox. When you ask people how they’d like to die, most will say that they want to die quickly, painlessly, and peacefully… preferably in their sleep. But, if you ask them whether they would want various types of interventions, were they on the cusp [Read More...]

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Reading Dante, a Little Help

0 Comments 05 July 2013

Many of us were asked somewhere in our education to read Dante’s Divine Comedy, or at least part of it. Mine came as a 1st year college student, if my memory serves me right, and I was so intensely focused on my girlfriend (now my wife, Kris), my own studies in Bible and theology, playing basketball [Read More...]

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